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talesofthestarshipregeneration:

TRANSGRIOT: Black Transwoman Monica Jones convicted of “manifesting intent to prostitution” in Arizona

Have another reason to not like Arizona despite some of the cool people who call it home. Been keeping an eye on the ongoing case of ASU student Monica Jones, who was accosted on the street while walking in her Phoenix neighborhood during a sting operation and charged with ‘manifestation of intent to prostitute’ the very night after she spoke at a May 2013 rally denouncing Project ROSE.  .Project ROSE is a program created with 15 partner organizations including the Phoenix Police Department with the goal of avoiding filing charges against adults engaged in prostitution, providing an opportunity for medical and social services and assistance in helping them exit the life of prostitution if they choose.   In practice, the program and its profiled prostitution sweeps target trans, SGL and low income women far too often and has a 30% success rate, the same rate as a woman who goes before a judge and hasn’t gone through the unjust Catholic Charities supported program.   
Jones believes she was unfairly targeted for arrest because of her outspoken criticism of Project ROSE.   A Change.org petitionwas created urging the Phoenix city prosecutor to drop the charges against her..     

And they trying to throw her into a goddamn mens prison. FUCK the judge FUCK the poilice, FUCK the catholic charities, FUCK Project ROSE and ALLLLLL its partners. She is appealing. Keep her in your thoughts.

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

TRANSGRIOT: Black Transwoman Monica Jones convicted of “manifesting intent to prostitution” in Arizona

Have another reason to not like Arizona despite some of the cool people who call it home. 

Been keeping an eye on the ongoing case of ASU student Monica Jones, who was accosted on the street while walking in her Phoenix neighborhood during a sting operation and charged with ‘manifestation of intent to prostitute’ the very night after she spoke at a May 2013 rally denouncing Project ROSE.  .

Project ROSE is a program created with 15 partner organizations including the Phoenix Police Department with the goal of avoiding filing charges against adults engaged in prostitution, providing an opportunity for medical and social services and assistance in helping them exit the life of prostitution if they choose.   

In practice, the program and its profiled prostitution sweeps target trans, SGL and low income women far too often and has a 30% success rate, the same rate as a woman who goes before a judge and hasn’t gone through the unjust Catholic Charities supported program.   


Jones believes she was unfairly targeted for arrest because of her outspoken criticism of Project ROSE.   A Change.org petitionwas created urging the Phoenix city prosecutor to drop the charges against her..     

And they trying to throw her into a goddamn mens prison. FUCK the judge FUCK the poilice, FUCK the catholic charities, FUCK Project ROSE and ALLLLLL its partners. She is appealing. Keep her in your thoughts.

(via glompcat)

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glaad:

Monica Jones, a transgender woman of color (BLACK) and activist living in Arizona, was arrested and found guilty by a judge of “manifesting prostitution” because authorities are targeting and profiling trans women. #StandWithMonica!

glaad:

Monica Jones, a transgender woman of color (BLACK) and activist living in Arizona, was arrested and found guilty by a judge of “manifesting prostitution” because authorities are targeting and profiling trans women. #StandWithMonica!

(via ana2199)

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avatarsnowy:

the university of illinois at urbana is trying to get surgery and hormone treatment for trans ppl included in their student health insurance but there’s some pushback from the board of trustees so if you have a moment please sign and signal boost the petition for its inclusion!

(Source: faircommentfuckoff, via shiracirca)

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Laverne Cox: Transforming Hollywood
The trailblazing Orange is the New Black star has become a powerful voice for trans people, including CeCe McDonald.
As Sophia Burset, the only trans character in Orange is the New Black—the hit Netflix show about a women’s prison—Laverne Cox is breaking new ground as a transgender actor in a field where trans women are still rare. But Cox is also gaining fame for her powerful off-screen politics as she advocates for transgender rights.
Most recently, Cox has lent both her star power and her organizing power to the case ofCeCe McDonald, an African-American trans woman sentenced to 41 months in prison for a killing she says occurred in self-defense. In 2011, a group of white people taunted McDonald and her friends with racist and transphobic epithets outside a bar in Minneapolis. In the ensuing altercation, McDonald defended herself with scissors from her purse. She was wounded and a white man, Dean Schmitz, was killed. McDonald was convicted of second-degree murder.
McDonald’s case became a flash point for trans activists because of several perceived injustices in her trial and sentencing. First, the judge barred expert testimony about the everyday violence faced by trans people, which would have been used to support the case for self-defense. Then McDonald was sent to a men’s prison—where trans women face not only a high risk of violence, but also the trauma of being stripped of their gender.
When McDonald was released early on parole this January, Cox was among those waiting to greet her. Cox is working withdirector Jacqueline Gares on Free CeCe, a film documenting McDonald’s first year out of prison.
Cox spoke with In These Times about why McDonald’s case moved her, the future of trans acting and activism, and what’s next for Orange is the New Black.
What inspired you to make a documentary about CeCe McDonald?
I became aware of CeCe’s case a few weeks after it happened. Her case spoke so much to me because I could very easily have been her. CeCe was just walking down the street with a group of her friends when she was attacked. Often, I’ve been just walking down the street and heard anti-trans and racist slurs, and I was even kicked on the street once. So many trans women don’t survive these kinds of attacks. In 2012, 53 percent of homicides in the LGBTQ community were trans women, and 73 percent [of all homicides] are people of color. So the film is also about the culture of violence against trans women as an epidemic.
Advocating for her case wasn’t hard for me because this woman is a survivor. She did not want to die that day. I asked CeCe, during my interview with her, “Do you think if you had not pulled those scissors out, that he would have killed you?” And she said, “Yes.” He was charging and lunging at her with hate in his eyes and—not to retry the case—but this is a white supremacist with a swastika tattooed on his chest, and she feared for her life.
Yet the initial media coverage was sympathetic to Schmitz and not McDonald. Why do you think that is?
The coverage was transphobic and transmisogynistic and racist. What Billy Navarro, one of her major advocates, said to me when I interviewed him was, “The media was so upset with CeCe because she had the audacity to survive.”
I think the media is really comfortable reading about trans women of color as victims after they die, but if we have the audacity to survive, we are immediately criminalized; that is what the system does. The intersecting transphobia, transmisogyny, racism and classism in the criminal justice system—all of that converged in her story. CeCe was arrested on the spot that night; no one else was arrested. It took them [nearly] a year to arrest the person who smashed a glass into CeCe’s face. Because I’m on a show that looks at the injustice of the criminal justice system, it’s a no-brainer for me to be involved in this project.
You’ve talked about these issues on Katie Couric’s show. How do you go about making these complicated analyses to general audiences who are more used to, as you point out, feeling sorry for trans people who die than advocating for survivors?
I’ve been so inspired by folks at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, the Audre Lorde Project, Queers for Economic Justice (which doesn’t exist anymore) and so many radical folks who have spoken about intersectionality. My Black identity doesn’t go away because I’m trans, and the forces of racism don’t go away because I’m trans; they actually are compounded by transphobia and transmisogyny. I’d be doing myself and my community a disservice if I didn’t speak in an intersectional way.
I hope to challenge the LGBTQ community as a whole to look at its transphobia, to look at its racism. Speaking from the truth of my own experience, I think that the LGBTQ community needs to be a social justice movement in general, and I don’t think it has been, in its mainstream incarnation.
You are one of the few trans actors, period. You’ve talked about the need for nuanced trans characters, instead of the usual stereotypical and problematic ones. But does nuanced always have to mean a good person? Can you play, for instance, a murderer?
Looking at the evolution of Black representation in the media, or of gay and lesbian representation, it’s difficult and it takes time. I’ve always believed it’s about having multiple stories out there about different kinds of people. I’m against the idea of positive versus negative representation. I would love to play a really interesting, complicated murderer. Those are the roles I live for.
We’ve seen actors who are cisgender (not trans) playing trans characters in film and television. Are we nearing a time when a trans actor might, for instance, play a cisgender woman?
I absolutely believe it’s possible. It starts with directors, writers and producers saying, “Laverne is a wonderful actress and she’s right for this part, so let’s cast her” [laughs]. I’ve played a couple of roles onstage, and a character in a film called The Exhibitionists, that weren’t written for trans actors.
You met CeCe McDonald face-to-face for the first time just after she was released. What was it like to meet the woman for whom you’d been advocating?
CeCe is a young, vibrant, remarkable woman. She’d heard Beyoncé’s album in prison, but she hadn’t seen the video, so two hours after she got out of prison we were watching it and talking about Beyoncé and jamming in this diner. She said that in [the men’s] prison, they were trying to strip her of her womanhood and her trans life, so she just wants to celebrate those things when she gets out, and she’s doing that.
Would you describe yourself as a prison abolitionist?
That’s something I’ve sort of gone back and forth with. From talking to CeCe and her supporters, it does seem like abolishing prisons is the way to go. But then, for the folks who are already serving time: What can we do to make their time more humane and more safe? The people inside need help now; they need support, policies and advocacy.
What do you think needs to fundamentally shift in the LGBTQ mainstream movement, so that it takes trans issues, and especially prison issues, into consideration?
Most of it is actually having trans people, particularly trans people of color, in leadership positions in LGBTQ organizations, [beyond] tokenizing. It’s also important for each and every one of us, no matter who we are, to interrogate our own internalized transphobia, homophobia, racism and classism. And also to get resources to the folks who are doing the work on the ground—like Katie Burgess and other grassroots activists in Minneapolis, who brought CeCe’s story to international audiences and advocated fiercely for her. They did that with basically no resources; what could they do if they actually had money to advocate?
On that note, how can people support your film?
We’re probably looking at another year of production, and we need funding. People can donate via Indiegogo or at FreeCeceDocumentary.net.
Can you tell us anything about the next season of Orange is the New Black?
Oh my, it’s really, really juicy. It’s really fantastic. All that I can say without giving too much away is that [actor] Lorraine Toussaint has joined our cast, and Lorraine is major [laughs]. Her character really stirs the pot. Expect the unexpected with this season.
source
Laverne Cox: Transforming Hollywood

The trailblazing Orange is the New Black star has become a powerful voice for trans people, including CeCe McDonald.

As Sophia Burset, the only trans character in Orange is the New Black—the hit Netflix show about a women’s prison—Laverne Cox is breaking new ground as a transgender actor in a field where trans women are still rare. But Cox is also gaining fame for her powerful off-screen politics as she advocates for transgender rights.

Most recently, Cox has lent both her star power and her organizing power to the case ofCeCe McDonald, an African-American trans woman sentenced to 41 months in prison for a killing she says occurred in self-defense. In 2011, a group of white people taunted McDonald and her friends with racist and transphobic epithets outside a bar in Minneapolis. In the ensuing altercation, McDonald defended herself with scissors from her purse. She was wounded and a white man, Dean Schmitz, was killed. McDonald was convicted of second-degree murder.

McDonald’s case became a flash point for trans activists because of several perceived injustices in her trial and sentencing. First, the judge barred expert testimony about the everyday violence faced by trans people, which would have been used to support the case for self-defense. Then McDonald was sent to a men’s prison—where trans women face not only a high risk of violence, but also the trauma of being stripped of their gender.

When McDonald was released early on parole this January, Cox was among those waiting to greet her. Cox is working withdirector Jacqueline Gares on Free CeCe, a film documenting McDonald’s first year out of prison.

Cox spoke with In These Times about why McDonald’s case moved her, the future of trans acting and activism, and what’s next for Orange is the New Black.

What inspired you to make a documentary about CeCe McDonald?

I became aware of CeCe’s case a few weeks after it happened. Her case spoke so much to me because I could very easily have been her. CeCe was just walking down the street with a group of her friends when she was attacked. Often, I’ve been just walking down the street and heard anti-trans and racist slurs, and I was even kicked on the street once. So many trans women don’t survive these kinds of attacks. In 2012, 53 percent of homicides in the LGBTQ community were trans women, and 73 percent [of all homicides] are people of color. So the film is also about the culture of violence against trans women as an epidemic.

Advocating for her case wasn’t hard for me because this woman is a survivor. She did not want to die that day. I asked CeCe, during my interview with her, “Do you think if you had not pulled those scissors out, that he would have killed you?” And she said, “Yes.” He was charging and lunging at her with hate in his eyes and—not to retry the case—but this is a white supremacist with a swastika tattooed on his chest, and she feared for her life.

Yet the initial media coverage was sympathetic to Schmitz and not McDonald. Why do you think that is?

The coverage was transphobic and transmisogynistic and racist. What Billy Navarro, one of her major advocates, said to me when I interviewed him was, “The media was so upset with CeCe because she had the audacity to survive.”

I think the media is really comfortable reading about trans women of color as victims after they die, but if we have the audacity to survive, we are immediately criminalized; that is what the system does. The intersecting transphobia, transmisogyny, racism and classism in the criminal justice system—all of that converged in her story. CeCe was arrested on the spot that night; no one else was arrested. It took them [nearly] a year to arrest the person who smashed a glass into CeCe’s face. Because I’m on a show that looks at the injustice of the criminal justice system, it’s a no-brainer for me to be involved in this project.

You’ve talked about these issues on Katie Couric’s show. How do you go about making these complicated analyses to general audiences who are more used to, as you point out, feeling sorry for trans people who die than advocating for survivors?

I’ve been so inspired by folks at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, the Audre Lorde Project, Queers for Economic Justice (which doesn’t exist anymore) and so many radical folks who have spoken about intersectionality. My Black identity doesn’t go away because I’m trans, and the forces of racism don’t go away because I’m trans; they actually are compounded by transphobia and transmisogyny. I’d be doing myself and my community a disservice if I didn’t speak in an intersectional way.

I hope to challenge the LGBTQ community as a whole to look at its transphobia, to look at its racism. Speaking from the truth of my own experience, I think that the LGBTQ community needs to be a social justice movement in general, and I don’t think it has been, in its mainstream incarnation.

You are one of the few trans actors, period. You’ve talked about the need for nuanced trans characters, instead of the usual stereotypical and problematic ones. But does nuanced always have to mean a good person? Can you play, for instance, a murderer?

Looking at the evolution of Black representation in the media, or of gay and lesbian representation, it’s difficult and it takes time. I’ve always believed it’s about having multiple stories out there about different kinds of people. I’m against the idea of positive versus negative representation. I would love to play a really interesting, complicated murderer. Those are the roles I live for.

We’ve seen actors who are cisgender (not trans) playing trans characters in film and television. Are we nearing a time when a trans actor might, for instance, play a cisgender woman?

I absolutely believe it’s possible. It starts with directors, writers and producers saying, “Laverne is a wonderful actress and she’s right for this part, so let’s cast her” [laughs]. I’ve played a couple of roles onstage, and a character in a film called The Exhibitionists, that weren’t written for trans actors.

You met CeCe McDonald face-to-face for the first time just after she was released. What was it like to meet the woman for whom you’d been advocating?

CeCe is a young, vibrant, remarkable woman. She’d heard Beyoncé’s album in prison, but she hadn’t seen the video, so two hours after she got out of prison we were watching it and talking about Beyoncé and jamming in this diner. She said that in [the men’s] prison, they were trying to strip her of her womanhood and her trans life, so she just wants to celebrate those things when she gets out, and she’s doing that.

Would you describe yourself as a prison abolitionist?

That’s something I’ve sort of gone back and forth with. From talking to CeCe and her supporters, it does seem like abolishing prisons is the way to go. But then, for the folks who are already serving time: What can we do to make their time more humane and more safe? The people inside need help now; they need support, policies and advocacy.

What do you think needs to fundamentally shift in the LGBTQ mainstream movement, so that it takes trans issues, and especially prison issues, into consideration?

Most of it is actually having trans people, particularly trans people of color, in leadership positions in LGBTQ organizations, [beyond] tokenizing. It’s also important for each and every one of us, no matter who we are, to interrogate our own internalized transphobia, homophobia, racism and classism. And also to get resources to the folks who are doing the work on the ground—like Katie Burgess and other grassroots activists in Minneapolis, who brought CeCe’s story to international audiences and advocated fiercely for her. They did that with basically no resources; what could they do if they actually had money to advocate?

On that note, how can people support your film?

We’re probably looking at another year of production, and we need funding. People can donate via Indiegogo or at FreeCeceDocumentary.net.

Can you tell us anything about the next season of Orange is the New Black?

Oh my, it’s really, really juicy. It’s really fantastic. All that I can say without giving too much away is that [actor] Lorraine Toussaint has joined our cast, and Lorraine is major [laughs]. Her character really stirs the pot. Expect the unexpected with this season.

source

(Source: face--the--strange, via ana2199)

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Links to Feminist Essays, Videos, and More

fuckyeah-femalecharacters:

I said a little while back that I would put together a list of recs to various essays and videos discussing feminism and female characters. Here is the start of that list, as well as a link to the page for it available on this blog. More will be added to that page as time goes on, and feel free to message me with suggestions.

The Misadventures of Comic Book Girl - A wonderful and heartbreaking essay written by adventuresofcomicbookgirl, about her experiences as a fan of comics and the sexism she faced.

How We Teach Our Kids that Women Are Liars - An article by Soraya Chemaly, exploring how women must often struggle to prove themselves telling the truth, and how this misogynistic stereotype is perpetuated.

Tropes Vs. Women in Video Games - The famous web essays by Anita Sarkeesian, exploring the harmful and misogynistic tropes about women that are oh-so-popular in video games.

Laverne Cox on Bullying and Being a Trans Woman of Color - Laverne Cox, activist and actress from Orange is the New Black, discusses transmisogyny and the issues she has faced as a trans woman of color.

Historically Authentic Sexism in Fantasy: Let’s Unpack That - This article discusses in-depth the idea of fantasy echoing sexism in history. "History is actually a long series of centuries of men writing down what they thought was important and interesting, and FORGETTING TO WRITE ABOUT WOMEN. It’s also a long series of centuries of women’s work and women’s writing being actively denigrated by men."

Girl Trouble: We Care About Young Women as Symbols, Not as People - An article by Laurie Penny discussing how women are not even viewed as people, and are instead demonized and viewed as objects or symbols.

Why Buffy Isn’t a Feminist Show - A short but well-written tumblr post expressing the troubling aspects of Buffy as a show, and the often sexist writing it employed.

Its Alright; You’re a Boy "Modest is hottest". A young girl takes on her principal and her school over the sexism they express in their dress policy.

Mary-Sue What Are You? Or, Why the Concept of a Mary-Sue is Sexist - An essay examining the double standards involved in female characters being labeled “mary-sues”, once again by adventuresofcomicbookgirl.

What Scares Me is the World We Live In - A young man engages in a social experiement to see how other will react to him dressing in stereotypical “women’s clothes”, and he not only faces more harassment and abuse than he expected, but he fully realizes and admits that he will never truly understand what it is like to live as a woman. 

Gender Inequality in Film - An infographic from the New York Film Academy.

Of Course Not All Men Hate Women. But All Men Must Know They Benefit from Sexism - Another article from Laurie Penny discussing how men benefit from sexism, and the flawed thinking that comes from men claiming that we must stop “hurting their feelings” when it comes to their roles in sexism.

What’s the Creepiest Thing Someone Has Said to You While Cosplaying - From Buzzfeed, several pictures of women in cosplay, holding signs of the creepiest things men have said to them while they were cosplaying.

Michelle Rodriguez Made Me Cry at Comic-Con - A first-hand account of sexism at San Diego Comic-Con by Kate Conway, and a panel with Michelle Rodriguez where such sexism was discussed.

What Women Want (in Video Game Protagonists) - An article from the Mary-sue exploring the kind of roles women would like to see for female characters in video games.

The Problem With “The Problem With False Feminism”, a Strongly Worded Essay - Discusses the movie “Frozen” in feminist terms, and it refutes some of its anti-feminist claims, while still pointing out the problematic aspects of the movie.

This will be added to over time, and you can see the page for it here.

omg it’s my writing! I’m on a list! Thanks so much I’m flattered! And this is good stuff!

(via cjwritergal)

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radically-disabled:

sistahmamaqueen:

TUMBLR: WE NEED YOUR HELP. 

JANET MOCK IS GOING BACK ON PIERS MORGAN TONIGHT AND TWITTER HAS A #TEAMJANET #TEAMPIERS 

AND LET ME TELL YOU 

#TEAMPIERS IS FULL OF TRANSMISOGYNISTIC DICK HEADS

PLEASE SHOW YOUR LOVE USING #TEAMJANET AND VALIDATE JANET’S FEELINGS ABOUT HER INTERVIEW 

THNX

XOXO

If you are on Twitter jump on this shit.

And seriously, folks, get reblogging this. Supporting trans women of color is fucking important.

(via optimisticduelist)

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theweetosdoesart:

lich-like-lichen:

theweetosdoesart:

Even if Billy would have wanted to be a boy it’s not like he would have had the choice anyway

Ummm, I’m sorry I just started shipping Billy and Peter because they are both too cute! I mean what if they just like went off to the playground or something to hang out after this and were talking and having fun then they just hold hands as the sun sets! So adorable!

This little story is too cute to handle

(via erumaren-ainulindale)

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haha those fuckers who caused that woman to commit suicide aren’t letting me post on their wall

"Freedom of speech" and "exposing the truth" doesn’t mean much when it comes to comments that might hurt THEM.

WHAT a fucking disgrace to journalism and humanity

Text

Killing trans women isn’t bad press.

askatranswoman:

ESPN killed a trans woman. And the author was told “eh, just don’t do it again?” by everyone above him. He still has the job he used to kill a trans person because killing a trans woman isn’t bad press.

I want you to understand this story. It’s here if you can stomach the problematic, transphobic language and the incredibly problematic responses that they’ve made (oh, we should have checked first, but ‘he’ shouldn’t have hidden that ‘he’ was trans so whoops is among the most disturbing writings on this whole story.)

Dr. V is a woman who was in deep stealth. She was very much in the closet to everyone that she met and this was a good thing. She’d spent a lot of time and energy making sure people respected her and treated her decently in a new life because, let’s face it, when you transition people treat you like shit fairly often and she didn’t want that anymore.

She invented this putter. It’s an interesting piece of kit, and the design is still selling if you care about golf. Essentially it’s using physics phenomenon to balance out some of the forces, I haven’t really looked into the technology but she had a lot of professionals saying it made an impact in their putting, to the point that some refused to share details because they were still on tours and they viewed them as “invaluable.”

She asks, when he starts the article, that it be about “the science, not the scientist.” She asks that he focuses on the invention and not her. He agrees, they write about this for a while, he writes an article, it’s interesting, they meet, discuss the physics, and he goes to keep writing.

Then he stumbles across the fact that she might be trans.

And he starts doing all this research. She doesn’t have degrees in her name from the schools she said she did, she didn’t have the job experience under her name … so he researched and found out she was transgender, she experienced serious discrimination to the point she had to sue a former employer, that her closeted life had been somewhat different then what she had disclosed (you mean someone who was trans hid the thing they can be murdered for well? what?) and that she has hidden this as hard as he can.

So he continues to dig. Including calling her investors and friends and telling them she was transgender and giving them information about who she was before she transitioned.

He told people she didn’t have the experience or degrees she was says she had. That not only was she trans but she was a fraud (despite getting confirmation from someone externally that she was, in fact, the person with the experience 

She offered to show him the proof that she had the degrees, if he would sign something that he wouldn’t publish it. He said he “couldn’t take that deal.” She’d probably be alive if he had.

She killed herself before it was published.

And you know what’s happened because of this?

Nothing. No-one has been fired. The editor even said that they didn’t want to “make the author feel bad.” But I couldn’t care less because this transphobic murderer isn’t my friend or co-worker. He’s just someone who could give two fucks about whose life he destroys. I spent this morning crying after reading this article, because it was such a clear reminder that we’re the only ones who will stand up for ourselves.

His articles are here,

His twitter is here.

The page where these editors feel like murdering trans women is just a little slip up is here. Their Facebook is here.

The editor that said those horrific things and approved the entire article to be published is here.

I’m tired of this. I’m tired of finding out we can be beaten to death in front of police officers and have nothing happen. I’m tired of finding out that reason we were called f***gots still rings true - we are valued as less then the price of a match. They think of us as fire starters.

Fine. Let’s start a few fires.

Let’s show them that we’re not taking this shit sitting down. They aren’t allowed to do this to us with impunity anymore. We’re not going to let these people kill us without a fight. Fuck, every single one of us has been fighting since we came out of the closet. No more standing down.

And I’m calling in every single person that has every claimed to be an ally to trans people. This is disgusting, this shit needs to stop, and you could help. We need as many voices as possible.

Anyone identifying as a Radical Feminist - they’re making women kill themselves. Either admit you’re transphobic and stay away from the LGBT movement, or back up what you have said and stand with us.

Anyone who identifies as catholic, christian, muslim, jewish, or any religion that’s had a seriously problematic time dealing with trans people - this isn’t theological, it’s basic morals, we’re being killed out here. Help.

Anyone identifying as an LGBT supporter or ally - I don’t care if you’ve never done anything before for transgender people before. Get involved. There are no side line players, either you’re with us or your silence supports those that would have us killed in the streets.

Anyone who has called themselves out as a member of the Rainbow Lantern Corps - you’re needed now. This might not be the reason the response structure was made but we need pressure and let’s face it, the quicker we make people see transgender people deserve basic respect the sooner corrective therapy ends.

Make ESPN send a message, clearly, to anyone who works for them either directly or indirectly - outing a transgender woman is wrong. The resulting suicide should be taken seriously and should be held under actual journalistic scrutiny.

Calab Hannan should be fired. Anything short of permanently losing his position is an insult to the transgender community, and saying that kind of unethical dribble passes for journalism lowers the standard of every publication he touches.

Anything you can send in, letters, tweets, anything, will help. Spreading this around so more people see it will help. We need to respond to this or this shit will keep happening.

Let’s light a few fires.

(via voyageviolet)

Photoset

i think we saw a clip of this is gender studies actually! thanks as always for tagging me, angel :)

(Source: fuckyeahlgbtqartists, via maddamspade)