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rhazade-waterbender:

attackonmonobear:

why are all characters with the name mako/to all have dark hair and are really nice and supportive and consider the feelings of their friends all the timeimage

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and then there’s this asshole

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Good question; she belongs on this list.

As for the anime characters, I recognize Makoto Kino (AKA Sailor Jupiter) and Makoto Tachibana from Free! (and of course the bad idea, although he’s not an anime character), but not the other two.

last two are Ryuko’s friend from Kill la Kill and the main character of Dangan Ronpa.

i hate kill la kill but both these characters are still better than lok mako.

(Source: tamalesenpai, via reisempai)

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agentbering:

goodfuckingcoffee:

#yeah let’s talk about how much brighter a child’s future would be if they grew up with 2 parents #while standing in front of a man who had a single mom #and became president of the united states #if only he’d had a father #he might have gotten somewhere in life.

(via morismako)

Tags: obama yes this
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shinjilicious:

reasons to love the utena movie

  • utena
  • anthy
  • utena and anthy dancing
  • utena and anthy making out
  • utena 
  • anthy
  • utena
  • anthy
  • KISSING

(via vayonpoole)

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(Source: condesces, via gingerrogerss)

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kwerey:

xhuuya:

There was no change. The author never specified what race the people were. For all we know, the dystopian society that it is has a blended race.

I suspect that no-one invested in this argument’s going to change their minds, but wow I really think all the many people who’ve reblogged this specifically to go ‘what change Katniss is totes white’ are the ones who ought to come up with a justification for why other than ‘I just assumed she was’. The books make a point of how it’s a thing that Katniss & Prim’s merchant-class mother’s marriage to a working-class dude is transgressive, and of how people always notice and admire Prim’s blonde blue-eyedness while the District all the workers are described as a cohesive group within which that phenotype doesn’t normally occur.

“Straight black hair, olive skin, we even have the same gray eyes. But we’re not related, at least not closely. Most of the families who work the mines resemble one another this way.”

Yeah it’s a dystopian future world where maybe ethnicity and so on has shifted, but everyone going “well maybe it’s a post-racial society” is missing the point really hard, because it is made pretty apparent from this that there are both socioeconomic disparities between this group and the whiter and more privileged group that Peeta and the unnamed mother come from.
I mean, whatever, I’m sure if you’re really really invested in this you can find ways to argue that it’s not about race some people from some areas just have kind of homogenous features, like in Wales or Ireland or whatever, but to be honest I’m not going to listen. Sure, despite all the hints to the contrary, I guess they could theoretically maybe be living in a completely postracial society. That’d really suit the rest of the sociopolitical content in this dystopian story about a cultural imperialist regime where the tyrant-in-chief is a white-haired white guy called President Snow. That sounds totally plausible.

kwerey:

xhuuya:

There was no change. The author never specified what race the people were. For all we know, the dystopian society that it is has a blended race.

I suspect that no-one invested in this argument’s going to change their minds, but wow I really think all the many people who’ve reblogged this specifically to go ‘what change Katniss is totes white’ are the ones who ought to come up with a justification for why other than ‘I just assumed she was’. The books make a point of how it’s a thing that Katniss & Prim’s merchant-class mother’s marriage to a working-class dude is transgressive, and of how people always notice and admire Prim’s blonde blue-eyedness while the District all the workers are described as a cohesive group within which that phenotype doesn’t normally occur.


“Straight black hair, olive skin, we even have the same gray eyes. But we’re not related, at least not closely. Most of the families who work the mines resemble one another this way.”

Yeah it’s a dystopian future world where maybe ethnicity and so on has shifted, but everyone going “well maybe it’s a post-racial society” is missing the point really hard, because it is made pretty apparent from this that there are both socioeconomic disparities between this group and the whiter and more privileged group that Peeta and the unnamed mother come from.

I mean, whatever, I’m sure if you’re really really invested in this you can find ways to argue that it’s not about race some people from some areas just have kind of homogenous features, like in Wales or Ireland or whatever, but to be honest I’m not going to listen. Sure, despite all the hints to the contrary, I guess they could theoretically maybe be living in a completely postracial society. That’d really suit the rest of the sociopolitical content in this dystopian story about a cultural imperialist regime where the tyrant-in-chief is a white-haired white guy called President Snow. That sounds totally plausible.

(Source: averagesparrow, via burritosong)

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angerliz:

wecansexy:

WOW HOW DID I NEVER NOTICE THIS…………WOW…..

o

oh

aaaaah!

(Source: avataraang)

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gwenfrankenstien:

[img: Barbara Gordon, a white woman with red hair, in her wheelchair,  smiling. Text: “I am no longer a distaff impersonation of someone else.  I’m me— more me than I have ever been. My life is my own. I embrace it, and the light, with a deep, continuing joy.”]
Speaking of Yale & Ostrander Oracle, here’s a relevant panel from Oracle: Year One (in Batman Chronicles #5)

gwenfrankenstien:

[img: Barbara Gordon, a white woman with red hair, in her wheelchair, smiling. Text: “I am no longer a distaff impersonation of someone else. I’m me— more me than I have ever been. My life is my own. I embrace it, and the light, with a deep, continuing joy.”]

Speaking of Yale & Ostrander Oracle, here’s a relevant panel from Oracle: Year One (in Batman Chronicles #5)

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Just a few words tonight

dcwomenkickingass:

Creativity is the ability to tell stories within parameters. It is the ability to work with what’s there and not have to reach or grasp beyond. Great artists respect their audiences. They create a bond with them to let the page, the note, the song create a moment of union. Great artists don’t underestimate their audiences. Or trick them. Or think they are too stupid or dumb to get what they are trying to say or do. They take their pens, they take their instruments, and they square off against their parameters and time after time are able to build something wonderful.

To say that there are no more stories to be told with Oracle is bullshit. To say that Batgirl is better character or a more appealing character carries some much horrible ableism it rakes at the bile in my stomach. To claim that Stephanie Brown and Cassandra Cain cannot be a Batgirl when three Robins are left running around Gotham illustrates the double standard that gallops through the Bat books. And DC Comics.

I’ve known this announcement has been coming for a bit. And each day I tried to convince myself they wouldn’t do it. But I knew they would. Shame on you DC. Shame on you for being so lazy and unimaginative. Shame on you for having such a low opinion of your audiences to think they can only accept one Batgirl. Shame on you for continued focus on the past instead of the future. And shame on you for taking one of the best characters in comics putting her out of commission.

Last year I ran a contest to name the most kick ass female in DC Comics. You know who won over Wonder Woman and Catwoman and Black Canary and ever other female that DC has trademark on? Oracle. The popular choice. But not DC’s choice.

I finally figure out tonight why Adam Hughes probably picked my sketch out of the long, long list of commissions he had in Boston. My guess, since he’s doing covers on the book, is he probably knew. Or maybe not. Whatever the reason, the piece I think says it all: