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Ghibli Opening Credits- Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind

(via morismako)

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(Source: zanarkaand, via morismako)

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karlathecockblock:

rougemarionette:

juvjuvychan:

The Women of Miyazaki

When people say movies, shows, books, etc, with female leads can’t sell and/or don’t have a market in mainstream media I simply shake my head and think of Miyazaki.  I think of his movies and how a majority of them, over the course of many years, have all starred female leads and are considered classics.  

Some people seem to think that women want the world when asking for female characters in mainstream media that aren’t; stereotypes, love interests, or sex objects.  These people seem to believe we’re asking some sort of impossible task and yet again I’m left thinking about Miyazaki and his amazing movies starring these amazing women.  

It’s not impossible, and we’re not asking for the world.  We’re asking for women, in our fiction, to be characters, to be presented as people.  Not as the love interest, not as the prize the male hero wins at the end of his struggles and rides off into the sunset with, not as a collection of body parts contorted to be sexy for the male gaze.  We’re asking for women to be good, to be bad, to be gray, to be heroes and villains, and morally in between.  We’re asking for women to be people. To be shown as such.  

When I watch Miyazaki’s films starring these women I see that.  I see women, or young girls, being strong, weak, capable, hurt, upset, smart, powerful, cunning, dreaming, struggling, women who are able to drive their own stories, make their own decisions, and be the heroes of their own tales.  

I see women who are presented as people. 

If you need an outline on how to write women, well, take some notes from these films and learn something. 

I just want to add that when I saw Hayao Miyazaki at SDCC when Ponyo came out, one of the questions he received was from a girl who asked why the main characters in his stories were female.

He smiled and responded with, “Because women are strong and beautiful.”

Though, doesn’t Miyazaki have some fucked up stances on when women grow older? I recently listened to an ANNcast episode with Helen Mccarthy on it where she mentions that he beleives that girls indeed haved unlimited potential, and therefore they should use that all when they’re young and then go off to the corner to be housewives and such? I mean, I haven’t been able to watch a lot of the guy’s movies recently(I really need to get Castle in the Sky so I can re-watch it) to see if this argument holds up based on his works, but I do recall older women in his recent works being mostly shown as evil to some degree if they do not fit into a motherly or housewife role.

Until there’s a REAL source I’m going to call total bullshit? If only because there was a kerfuffle a year or so ago where he’d APPARENTLY said women shouldn’t work especially in animation and it turned out to be a complete mistranslation/someone making shit up, I did some detective work and found he’d actually said the opposite. I don’t know why people want to make this stuff up, everyone’s reaction to the clearly false rumor were “oh he’s old and Japanese so that makes sense” which wow, it’s like they really want to believe Japanese = inherently sexist stop it people.

And it seems like bullshit since there are several older career women in his movies portrayed heroically. In Castle in the Sky there’s that old pirate lady, there’s the late-20s single lady in Kiki’s delivery service, all the working ladies in Princess Mononoke, all the working ladies in Porco Russo and Ponyo is his most recent movie and it has a working mother who straight up leaves her kid at home so she can go back to her job and it’s not even portrayed as a bad thing.

(via wickedwitchofthekexx)

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rougemarionette:

juvjuvychan:

The Women of Miyazaki

When people say movies, shows, books, etc, with female leads can’t sell and/or don’t have a market in mainstream media I simply shake my head and think of Miyazaki.  I think of his movies and how a majority of them, over the course of many years, have all starred female leads and are considered classics.  

Some people seem to think that women want the world when asking for female characters in mainstream media that aren’t; stereotypes, love interests, or sex objects.  These people seem to believe we’re asking some sort of impossible task and yet again I’m left thinking about Miyazaki and his amazing movies starring these amazing women.  

It’s not impossible, and we’re not asking for the world.  We’re asking for women, in our fiction, to be characters, to be presented as people.  Not as the love interest, not as the prize the male hero wins at the end of his struggles and rides off into the sunset with, not as a collection of body parts contorted to be sexy for the male gaze.  We’re asking for women to be good, to be bad, to be gray, to be heroes and villains, and morally in between.  We’re asking for women to be people. To be shown as such.  

When I watch Miyazaki’s films starring these women I see that.  I see women, or young girls, being strong, weak, capable, hurt, upset, smart, powerful, cunning, dreaming, struggling, women who are able to drive their own stories, make their own decisions, and be the heroes of their own tales.  

I see women who are presented as people. 

If you need an outline on how to write women, well, take some notes from these films and learn something. 

I just want to add that when I saw Hayao Miyazaki at SDCC when Ponyo came out, one of the questions he received was from a girl who asked why the main characters in his stories were female.

He smiled and responded with, “Because women are strong and beautiful.”

(via shatterdome-sansa-deactivated20)

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mellydash:

dragonsroar:

megumiovvo:

Let me tell you about this woman.
I saw her walking down the stairs and away from the convention center on Sunday at Anime Expo. For those of you who do not know, she’s cosplaying as Sophie from Howl’s Moving Castle. I asked to take her picture and she happily complied. After, she told us that it’s hard to her to find cosplays because she’s in her eighties. 
This woman is over 80 years old and she’s cosplaying, going to conventions, and being amazing. 
Props to this wonderful woman for her wonderful cosplay and time.

THIS LADY WAS WONDERFUL

WHAT AN ABSOLUTE DARLING. 
GOSH. 
I WANNA BE THIS EPIC WHEN I’M OLD. 

mellydash:

dragonsroar:

megumiovvo:

Let me tell you about this woman.

I saw her walking down the stairs and away from the convention center on Sunday at Anime Expo. For those of you who do not know, she’s cosplaying as Sophie from Howl’s Moving Castle. I asked to take her picture and she happily complied. After, she told us that it’s hard to her to find cosplays because she’s in her eighties

This woman is over 80 years old and she’s cosplaying, going to conventions, and being amazing. 

Props to this wonderful woman for her wonderful cosplay and time.

THIS LADY WAS WONDERFUL

WHAT AN ABSOLUTE DARLING. 

GOSH. 

I WANNA BE THIS EPIC WHEN I’M OLD. 

(via morismako)

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Kiki and Tombo!

Kiki and Tombo!

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"

[An excerpt from an interview.]

Question: Why do you always choose a girl as your theme?

Miyazaki: I don’t logically plan it that way. When we compare a man in action and a girl in action, I feel girls are more gallant. If a boy is walking with a long stride, I don’t think anything particular, but if a girl is walking gallantly, I feel “that’s cool.” Maybe that’s because I’m a man, and women may think it’s cool when they see a young man striding. At first, I thought “this is no longer the era of men. This is no longer the era of taigimeibun.” But after ten years, I grew tired of saying that. I just say “cause I like women.” That has more reality.

"

— [Kikan Iichiko, October 20, 1994. Reprinted inShuppatsuten by Hayao Miyazaki; published by Tokuma Shoten, 1996.] From here. (via kentsarrow)

(via squintyoureyes)

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千と千尋の神隠し

Spirited Away”

(Source: ask-korra-the-avatar, via sailorscooby)

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