Video

leseanthomas:

SAYO YAMAMOTO (山本 沙代 Yamamoto Sayo; born April 13, 1977/ age 36) is a Japanese anime director. She is known for directing the critically acclaimed anime series Michiko to Hatchin and Lupin III: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine. After graduating from the College of Art and Design in Tokyo, she began work at Studio Madhouse at age 25.

During her time at the College of Art and Design, Yamamoto focused her attention on animation, as she felt less interested in the other things she was being taught. Her student project was an animation about samurai using actor, and frequent Akira Kurosawa collaborator, Toshiro Mifune as an inspiration. While in the process of looking for a job after graduation, she showed this work to director Satoshi Kon (R.I.P).

Enthusiastic about her potential, Kon intended to hire her to work on his second feature Millennium Actress, but studio politics eventually caused her to leave the project.

She had her debut at Studio Madhouse working on the X television series headed by Madhouse director Yoshiaki Kawajiri. Soon after, she would have her first collaboration with directors Takeshi Koike and Katsuhito Ishii on the original video animation Trava: Fist Planet. It was during her time at Madhouse that she began her work on anime opening and ending animations, which she would go on to direct for many other projects.

Yamamoto has stated that it was during her work on Samurai Champloo where she felt she was first able to truly express herself. Samurai Champloo also marks the first time she worked with frequent collaborators, director Shinichirō Watanabe (Cowboy Bebop) and writer Dai Satō (Cowboy bebop, eureka Seven, Ghost In The Shell: Stand Alone Complex).

During her time working on Samurai Champloo at Studio Manglobe, she was offered the chance to direct a project with full creative control. At the time, she was busy with work on Champloo, so she thought about what kind of project she wanted to direct for about a year. During that time, she took a trip to Brazil where she found the inspiration for her first series Michiko to Hatchin. The series, about an ex-convict and a young girl in search of the girl’s father, was released in 2008.

At the press conference where Yamamoto unveiled the series, she said she wanted women especially to watch the series.

"Our time slot was late at night, so office ladies would be returning home, and worn out from the day, they could have a beer and watch it."

After a few years of working on storyboards and art for other projects, including movies Redline and Evangelion: 2.0 You Can (Not) Advance, she was approached by a producer to create a new Lupin III series, with full creative control. It was Yamamoto’s own idea to have the series take place before the start of the 1971 Lupin series, directed by Masaaki Ōsumi, and to have character Fujiko Mine in the starring role.

—————————————————————

Her most recent works was director of episode 2 of the wildly popular Space Dandy : “The Search For The Phantom Space Ramen, Baby”

(via prynnette)

Photo
travelerontheedge17:

queeringfeministreality:

vastderp:

goddamn look at that control

WHATHEFUCK

I just spent the last 10 min staring at this

travelerontheedge17:

queeringfeministreality:

vastderp:

goddamn look at that control

WHATHEFUCK

I just spent the last 10 min staring at this

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via azuresquirrel)

Text

Bahina part two

adventuresofcomicbookgirl:

Well eventually at least the guru came and was like to her husband “you’d better treat this girl better because is super holy I don’t know what you did in a past life to deserve to be with her but yeah i’d be grateful”

and then the calf died and Bahina lapsed into a coma and had visions and IT WAS SAD i was super in love with her and that calf being bff’s so i felt her pain poor girl.

She makes this big speech about how she had been a bad wife and a wife’s god should be her husband and it’s awkward to read from my modern perspective but I love how despite this she apparently just…keeps being saintly? And her husband comes around maybe it’s hard to tell.

then later she tells her son about all her previous lives and

basically all her lives were like “yeah so I was so awesome I didn’t have to get married yep I did holy stuff and I was a milkmaid” and then “well I did get married but the dude died immediately and this was  advantageous to me” (she flat out said this. haha omg) and then the last two lives were “and then I married really awesome dudes who were famous holy people and astronomers and we got along really well and were holy and they respected me and I was super helpful to them” and finally “and then your dad let’s not talk about that”.

just like, i think there’s a theme here. 

so yeah I enjoyed that one too.

Text

now onto Bahina Bai

adventuresofcomicbookgirl:

so Bahina was married to this abusive douche at age eleven and she was way too holy for him to handle

she had this calf and that calf loved her so much they were bros and went everywhere together

the calf even went to church and prayed with her and everyone was like “HOLY SHIT HOW HOLY IS THIS GIRL”

her husband was jealous that everyone was paying attention to her and not him (apparently he had the maturity of a five year old) so he

(trigger warning double wammy of severe spousal and child abuse)

tied her up and threw her off a roof. Yes. She was thirteen or still eleven i can’t remember by the way. He was like in his thirties. And That is what he did. Her family just watched because apparently she was his property holy shit.

oh and to top that off the translator decided to be a condescending douchebag and put in his TOTALLY CLEVER LITTLE rhyme mocking the situation by turning the TEXT OF AN INDIAN SAINT into a parody of an ENGLISH NURSERY RHYME. “Bahina had a little calf its hair as black as coal and everywhere bahina went the calf was sure to go she followed her to church blablabla and everyone laughed and said
to think a calf could pray”

like wow, thanks dude that was so incredibly creative and worth interrupting the text for we really want to hear from some random dude’s bad attempts at humor you just couldn’t translate the text of an Indian woman without inserting your inane two cents? It’s like the ultimate example of how white guys who are obsessed with themselves just can’t let woc talk even if they’re FUCKING HINDU SAINTS and it’s not even accurate they didn’t laugh at her at all, they were super terrified and impressed and guru was like “whoa girl you are holy this is amazing”

also how disrespectful can you imagine if someone did that with like one of the saintly texts from Christianity? Yeah that would never happen because that person would be roasted on a spit.

man i’m not even done bahina gets a part two i guess.

Text

im always sad when my followers didn’t know about murasaki shikibu because she was super awesome. I’ll go find my posts on her from my pre-modern women writer’s class

also you should know: Sei Shonagan, Bahina Bai, Anna Komnena, Lady Hyegyong. Women have been kickin’ ass in writing since forever.

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mythosidhe:

Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.

mythosidhe:

Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.

(Source: dovsherman, via shuryorin)

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Laverne Cox: Transforming Hollywood
The trailblazing Orange is the New Black star has become a powerful voice for trans people, including CeCe McDonald.
As Sophia Burset, the only trans character in Orange is the New Black—the hit Netflix show about a women’s prison—Laverne Cox is breaking new ground as a transgender actor in a field where trans women are still rare. But Cox is also gaining fame for her powerful off-screen politics as she advocates for transgender rights.
Most recently, Cox has lent both her star power and her organizing power to the case ofCeCe McDonald, an African-American trans woman sentenced to 41 months in prison for a killing she says occurred in self-defense. In 2011, a group of white people taunted McDonald and her friends with racist and transphobic epithets outside a bar in Minneapolis. In the ensuing altercation, McDonald defended herself with scissors from her purse. She was wounded and a white man, Dean Schmitz, was killed. McDonald was convicted of second-degree murder.
McDonald’s case became a flash point for trans activists because of several perceived injustices in her trial and sentencing. First, the judge barred expert testimony about the everyday violence faced by trans people, which would have been used to support the case for self-defense. Then McDonald was sent to a men’s prison—where trans women face not only a high risk of violence, but also the trauma of being stripped of their gender.
When McDonald was released early on parole this January, Cox was among those waiting to greet her. Cox is working withdirector Jacqueline Gares on Free CeCe, a film documenting McDonald’s first year out of prison.
Cox spoke with In These Times about why McDonald’s case moved her, the future of trans acting and activism, and what’s next for Orange is the New Black.
What inspired you to make a documentary about CeCe McDonald?
I became aware of CeCe’s case a few weeks after it happened. Her case spoke so much to me because I could very easily have been her. CeCe was just walking down the street with a group of her friends when she was attacked. Often, I’ve been just walking down the street and heard anti-trans and racist slurs, and I was even kicked on the street once. So many trans women don’t survive these kinds of attacks. In 2012, 53 percent of homicides in the LGBTQ community were trans women, and 73 percent [of all homicides] are people of color. So the film is also about the culture of violence against trans women as an epidemic.
Advocating for her case wasn’t hard for me because this woman is a survivor. She did not want to die that day. I asked CeCe, during my interview with her, “Do you think if you had not pulled those scissors out, that he would have killed you?” And she said, “Yes.” He was charging and lunging at her with hate in his eyes and—not to retry the case—but this is a white supremacist with a swastika tattooed on his chest, and she feared for her life.
Yet the initial media coverage was sympathetic to Schmitz and not McDonald. Why do you think that is?
The coverage was transphobic and transmisogynistic and racist. What Billy Navarro, one of her major advocates, said to me when I interviewed him was, “The media was so upset with CeCe because she had the audacity to survive.”
I think the media is really comfortable reading about trans women of color as victims after they die, but if we have the audacity to survive, we are immediately criminalized; that is what the system does. The intersecting transphobia, transmisogyny, racism and classism in the criminal justice system—all of that converged in her story. CeCe was arrested on the spot that night; no one else was arrested. It took them [nearly] a year to arrest the person who smashed a glass into CeCe’s face. Because I’m on a show that looks at the injustice of the criminal justice system, it’s a no-brainer for me to be involved in this project.
You’ve talked about these issues on Katie Couric’s show. How do you go about making these complicated analyses to general audiences who are more used to, as you point out, feeling sorry for trans people who die than advocating for survivors?
I’ve been so inspired by folks at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, the Audre Lorde Project, Queers for Economic Justice (which doesn’t exist anymore) and so many radical folks who have spoken about intersectionality. My Black identity doesn’t go away because I’m trans, and the forces of racism don’t go away because I’m trans; they actually are compounded by transphobia and transmisogyny. I’d be doing myself and my community a disservice if I didn’t speak in an intersectional way.
I hope to challenge the LGBTQ community as a whole to look at its transphobia, to look at its racism. Speaking from the truth of my own experience, I think that the LGBTQ community needs to be a social justice movement in general, and I don’t think it has been, in its mainstream incarnation.
You are one of the few trans actors, period. You’ve talked about the need for nuanced trans characters, instead of the usual stereotypical and problematic ones. But does nuanced always have to mean a good person? Can you play, for instance, a murderer?
Looking at the evolution of Black representation in the media, or of gay and lesbian representation, it’s difficult and it takes time. I’ve always believed it’s about having multiple stories out there about different kinds of people. I’m against the idea of positive versus negative representation. I would love to play a really interesting, complicated murderer. Those are the roles I live for.
We’ve seen actors who are cisgender (not trans) playing trans characters in film and television. Are we nearing a time when a trans actor might, for instance, play a cisgender woman?
I absolutely believe it’s possible. It starts with directors, writers and producers saying, “Laverne is a wonderful actress and she’s right for this part, so let’s cast her” [laughs]. I’ve played a couple of roles onstage, and a character in a film called The Exhibitionists, that weren’t written for trans actors.
You met CeCe McDonald face-to-face for the first time just after she was released. What was it like to meet the woman for whom you’d been advocating?
CeCe is a young, vibrant, remarkable woman. She’d heard Beyoncé’s album in prison, but she hadn’t seen the video, so two hours after she got out of prison we were watching it and talking about Beyoncé and jamming in this diner. She said that in [the men’s] prison, they were trying to strip her of her womanhood and her trans life, so she just wants to celebrate those things when she gets out, and she’s doing that.
Would you describe yourself as a prison abolitionist?
That’s something I’ve sort of gone back and forth with. From talking to CeCe and her supporters, it does seem like abolishing prisons is the way to go. But then, for the folks who are already serving time: What can we do to make their time more humane and more safe? The people inside need help now; they need support, policies and advocacy.
What do you think needs to fundamentally shift in the LGBTQ mainstream movement, so that it takes trans issues, and especially prison issues, into consideration?
Most of it is actually having trans people, particularly trans people of color, in leadership positions in LGBTQ organizations, [beyond] tokenizing. It’s also important for each and every one of us, no matter who we are, to interrogate our own internalized transphobia, homophobia, racism and classism. And also to get resources to the folks who are doing the work on the ground—like Katie Burgess and other grassroots activists in Minneapolis, who brought CeCe’s story to international audiences and advocated fiercely for her. They did that with basically no resources; what could they do if they actually had money to advocate?
On that note, how can people support your film?
We’re probably looking at another year of production, and we need funding. People can donate via Indiegogo or at FreeCeceDocumentary.net.
Can you tell us anything about the next season of Orange is the New Black?
Oh my, it’s really, really juicy. It’s really fantastic. All that I can say without giving too much away is that [actor] Lorraine Toussaint has joined our cast, and Lorraine is major [laughs]. Her character really stirs the pot. Expect the unexpected with this season.
source
Laverne Cox: Transforming Hollywood

The trailblazing Orange is the New Black star has become a powerful voice for trans people, including CeCe McDonald.

As Sophia Burset, the only trans character in Orange is the New Black—the hit Netflix show about a women’s prison—Laverne Cox is breaking new ground as a transgender actor in a field where trans women are still rare. But Cox is also gaining fame for her powerful off-screen politics as she advocates for transgender rights.

Most recently, Cox has lent both her star power and her organizing power to the case ofCeCe McDonald, an African-American trans woman sentenced to 41 months in prison for a killing she says occurred in self-defense. In 2011, a group of white people taunted McDonald and her friends with racist and transphobic epithets outside a bar in Minneapolis. In the ensuing altercation, McDonald defended herself with scissors from her purse. She was wounded and a white man, Dean Schmitz, was killed. McDonald was convicted of second-degree murder.

McDonald’s case became a flash point for trans activists because of several perceived injustices in her trial and sentencing. First, the judge barred expert testimony about the everyday violence faced by trans people, which would have been used to support the case for self-defense. Then McDonald was sent to a men’s prison—where trans women face not only a high risk of violence, but also the trauma of being stripped of their gender.

When McDonald was released early on parole this January, Cox was among those waiting to greet her. Cox is working withdirector Jacqueline Gares on Free CeCe, a film documenting McDonald’s first year out of prison.

Cox spoke with In These Times about why McDonald’s case moved her, the future of trans acting and activism, and what’s next for Orange is the New Black.

What inspired you to make a documentary about CeCe McDonald?

I became aware of CeCe’s case a few weeks after it happened. Her case spoke so much to me because I could very easily have been her. CeCe was just walking down the street with a group of her friends when she was attacked. Often, I’ve been just walking down the street and heard anti-trans and racist slurs, and I was even kicked on the street once. So many trans women don’t survive these kinds of attacks. In 2012, 53 percent of homicides in the LGBTQ community were trans women, and 73 percent [of all homicides] are people of color. So the film is also about the culture of violence against trans women as an epidemic.

Advocating for her case wasn’t hard for me because this woman is a survivor. She did not want to die that day. I asked CeCe, during my interview with her, “Do you think if you had not pulled those scissors out, that he would have killed you?” And she said, “Yes.” He was charging and lunging at her with hate in his eyes and—not to retry the case—but this is a white supremacist with a swastika tattooed on his chest, and she feared for her life.

Yet the initial media coverage was sympathetic to Schmitz and not McDonald. Why do you think that is?

The coverage was transphobic and transmisogynistic and racist. What Billy Navarro, one of her major advocates, said to me when I interviewed him was, “The media was so upset with CeCe because she had the audacity to survive.”

I think the media is really comfortable reading about trans women of color as victims after they die, but if we have the audacity to survive, we are immediately criminalized; that is what the system does. The intersecting transphobia, transmisogyny, racism and classism in the criminal justice system—all of that converged in her story. CeCe was arrested on the spot that night; no one else was arrested. It took them [nearly] a year to arrest the person who smashed a glass into CeCe’s face. Because I’m on a show that looks at the injustice of the criminal justice system, it’s a no-brainer for me to be involved in this project.

You’ve talked about these issues on Katie Couric’s show. How do you go about making these complicated analyses to general audiences who are more used to, as you point out, feeling sorry for trans people who die than advocating for survivors?

I’ve been so inspired by folks at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, the Audre Lorde Project, Queers for Economic Justice (which doesn’t exist anymore) and so many radical folks who have spoken about intersectionality. My Black identity doesn’t go away because I’m trans, and the forces of racism don’t go away because I’m trans; they actually are compounded by transphobia and transmisogyny. I’d be doing myself and my community a disservice if I didn’t speak in an intersectional way.

I hope to challenge the LGBTQ community as a whole to look at its transphobia, to look at its racism. Speaking from the truth of my own experience, I think that the LGBTQ community needs to be a social justice movement in general, and I don’t think it has been, in its mainstream incarnation.

You are one of the few trans actors, period. You’ve talked about the need for nuanced trans characters, instead of the usual stereotypical and problematic ones. But does nuanced always have to mean a good person? Can you play, for instance, a murderer?

Looking at the evolution of Black representation in the media, or of gay and lesbian representation, it’s difficult and it takes time. I’ve always believed it’s about having multiple stories out there about different kinds of people. I’m against the idea of positive versus negative representation. I would love to play a really interesting, complicated murderer. Those are the roles I live for.

We’ve seen actors who are cisgender (not trans) playing trans characters in film and television. Are we nearing a time when a trans actor might, for instance, play a cisgender woman?

I absolutely believe it’s possible. It starts with directors, writers and producers saying, “Laverne is a wonderful actress and she’s right for this part, so let’s cast her” [laughs]. I’ve played a couple of roles onstage, and a character in a film called The Exhibitionists, that weren’t written for trans actors.

You met CeCe McDonald face-to-face for the first time just after she was released. What was it like to meet the woman for whom you’d been advocating?

CeCe is a young, vibrant, remarkable woman. She’d heard Beyoncé’s album in prison, but she hadn’t seen the video, so two hours after she got out of prison we were watching it and talking about Beyoncé and jamming in this diner. She said that in [the men’s] prison, they were trying to strip her of her womanhood and her trans life, so she just wants to celebrate those things when she gets out, and she’s doing that.

Would you describe yourself as a prison abolitionist?

That’s something I’ve sort of gone back and forth with. From talking to CeCe and her supporters, it does seem like abolishing prisons is the way to go. But then, for the folks who are already serving time: What can we do to make their time more humane and more safe? The people inside need help now; they need support, policies and advocacy.

What do you think needs to fundamentally shift in the LGBTQ mainstream movement, so that it takes trans issues, and especially prison issues, into consideration?

Most of it is actually having trans people, particularly trans people of color, in leadership positions in LGBTQ organizations, [beyond] tokenizing. It’s also important for each and every one of us, no matter who we are, to interrogate our own internalized transphobia, homophobia, racism and classism. And also to get resources to the folks who are doing the work on the ground—like Katie Burgess and other grassroots activists in Minneapolis, who brought CeCe’s story to international audiences and advocated fiercely for her. They did that with basically no resources; what could they do if they actually had money to advocate?

On that note, how can people support your film?

We’re probably looking at another year of production, and we need funding. People can donate via Indiegogo or at FreeCeceDocumentary.net.

Can you tell us anything about the next season of Orange is the New Black?

Oh my, it’s really, really juicy. It’s really fantastic. All that I can say without giving too much away is that [actor] Lorraine Toussaint has joined our cast, and Lorraine is major [laughs]. Her character really stirs the pot. Expect the unexpected with this season.

source

(Source: face--the--strange, via ana2199)

Photoset

jack-sploicer:

eustaciavye77:

geekerrific:

cyberteeth:

Chimamamda Ngozi Adiche, We Should All Be Feminists

The most powerful thing anyone has ever said to me: “You deserve to take up space.” 

Always reblog Chimimanda Ngozi Adiche

(also she writes good, if intense, books)

forever reblog

(Source: babyghosts, via danidandidaneee)

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josukehigashikata:

oh my god

josukehigashikata:

oh my god

(via angergirl)

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chthonic-cassandra:

northwestmagpie:

inja-y-ddraig:

inkfromtheoctopus:

The Adventures of Prince Achmen.1926. German.The oldest surviving animated film in history.

Nonono, you don’t understand how AWESOME this movie is
because it’s not done by a big production firm, or someone with a name as big as Walt Disney, no
the writer and “mind” behind this film was a WOMAN
yes, my dear tumblr peeps, the very first trick animator in the world was a young German woman who had an idea, and enough friends and time to make a feature-length animated film. And it took her three years
because the way this movie (and some shorter works she actually did before Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed) are done is really, really complex. You see those leaves, and the hair of the figures? Yes.
That’s hand-cut paper.
Lotte Reiniger - that’s her name, my friends - always loved the art beind the Chinese shadow puppetry, and after she heard a lecture by Paul Wegener (famous vor the early movies Der Golem and Der Student von Prag) about the possibilites of animated movies, she wanted to combine these two things.
And guys, how she combined it…
Most of the puppets and scenerey she made all by herself. Her friends set up a special table that was lighted from underneath, and in the later movies she would even change the colours of the background mid-scene to change the atmosphere. Above it was a camera, shooting photos of the scenes that she moved milimetre for milimetre for those 16 pictures per second she needed for her movie.
Which makes Die Abenteuer von Prinz Achmed not only the first animated feature-length movie, but also the first stop-motion movie.

I must find this and watch it.

I read about this in Marina Warner’s Stranger Magic! She has a whole chapter on it.


We saw this in history of animation!

chthonic-cassandra:

northwestmagpie:

inja-y-ddraig:

inkfromtheoctopus:

The Adventures of Prince Achmen.
1926. German.
The oldest surviving animated film in history.

Nonono, you don’t understand how AWESOME this movie is

because it’s not done by a big production firm, or someone with a name as big as Walt Disney, no

the writer and “mind” behind this film was a WOMAN

yes, my dear tumblr peeps, the very first trick animator in the world was a young German woman who had an idea, and enough friends and time to make a feature-length animated film. And it took her three years

because the way this movie (and some shorter works she actually did before Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed) are done is really, really complex. You see those leaves, and the hair of the figures? Yes.

That’s hand-cut paper.

Lotte Reiniger - that’s her name, my friends - always loved the art beind the Chinese shadow puppetry, and after she heard a lecture by Paul Wegener (famous vor the early movies Der Golem and Der Student von Prag) about the possibilites of animated movies, she wanted to combine these two things.

And guys, how she combined it…

Most of the puppets and scenerey she made all by herself. Her friends set up a special table that was lighted from underneath, and in the later movies she would even change the colours of the background mid-scene to change the atmosphere. Above it was a camera, shooting photos of the scenes that she moved milimetre for milimetre for those 16 pictures per second she needed for her movie.

Which makes Die Abenteuer von Prinz Achmed not only the first animated feature-length movie, but also the first stop-motion movie.

I must find this and watch it.

I read about this in Marina Warner’s Stranger Magic! She has a whole chapter on it.

We saw this in history of animation!

(via wrench-wench)